RH Brown

About RH Brown

The former veteran radio announcer and veteran Vietnam Era Army Medic is also an author. His autobiographical book, Call Me Gullah: An American Heritage is available via amazon.com in paperback and kindle.

Video: A Second Home For Webster County Officials

WEBSTER COUNTY, Miss. (WCBI) – Ever since the Webster County Courthouse in Walthall burned, county business is being done inside the Webster County Justice Court Building downtown Eupora.

Work space is limited, but there is an attitude of optimism…they’ll get the job done and hopefully meet upcoming deadlines.

“This will be the Circuit Clerk’s office. A door has been opened up to serve the public, and a counter. This here is going to open up so we can service the general public,” said Deborah Hood-Neal, Circuit Clerk.

Webster County officials and their workers are going to have to call Webster Justice Court their second home for the immediate and unforeseeable future.

In the meantime, available space, is in short supply.

“We’ve got carpenters, electricians, that are in the building as we speak. Working to re work some offices and make them to where we can put computers and whatever else the clerks need,” said Jimmy Forrester, Webster County PIO.

And so in the meantime they will shuffle and squeeze themselves around in restricted quarters.

The second week of the winter term of circuit court is already under their belt.

“So we wont have another term of court till June of this year. So that will give us time to see where we may be locating for that. So no elections for this year, thank goodness for that. We are making the best of the situation,” said Hood-Neal.

“But we are cramped and everybody is working together to do the best we can with what we’ve got at this point,” said Forrester.

What use to be the Highway Patrol License Division room is being used.

Marriage book records dating back from 1874 to the present were retrieved from the blaze and are in good shape.

To efficiently do their job Hood-Neal and her helpers will need them as they work towards an approaching deadline.

“We do our book keeping at the end of the month and that’s going to be a little limited, its still done manually so we should be able to get that information done and assessments and all turned over to the chancery clerk’s office,” said Hood-Neal.

If all goes well, the circuit clerk’s office should be ready by Monday morning at eight, to receive the public wanting to do business with the county.