Jennifer Ortega

About Jennifer Ortega

Reporter and Fill-in Anchor on the weekends. Jennifer Ortega joins our team all the way from South Florida. She's worked for CBS 12 and Hola Tv in West Palm Beach. Although she's a long way from home, she's excited to be a part of the WCBI News Team.

Video: Bugs For Food?

STARKVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) – It’s an interesting way to look at bugs. Some entomologist at MSU are now taking a new approach to world hunger.

Bugs for food? With the worlds population increasing drastically every year, entomologists at MSU have come up with a solution that has many dropping their jaws in shock.

“This is probably the most exciting thing that’s happening in insect rearing right now. We are looking at going up to 9.7 billion people by¬† 2050 and we’re looking at how do we feed all these people, how do we provide the protein for them. Insects may very much play a part of this,” said entomologist Dr. Frank Davis.

Tons of research on insects has been done by the Entomology Department,
Dr.Frank Davis says the research on eating insects is not a new concept and other countries have already been on this diet. Feeding bugs to chickens and pigs and now to humans for protein.

“I don’t know at this time, I think we still have enough protein to go about. But in the future, I think insect would be a good protein source for human consumption,” said research entomologist Muhammad Chaudhury.

Though people aren’t thrilled about eating bugs, the high protein in insects will have some people thinking twice.

“I think the concept is new, I think as long as we can present that in a way that people are open to the idea. But yea we had meal worm in our cookies and meal worm in our rice crispy treats and it was quite tasty,” said scientist Pamela Phillips.

But meal worms aren’t the only bug they’ve been experimenting with, soldier flies are just as easy to reproduce, that some say taste just as good as meat.

Entomologist say insects are cheaper to grow than a cow or chicken.