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  • STARKVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) – It’s a multimillion dollar, state-of-the art renovation in Starkville.The transformation of the historic Mill- or Mississippi State’s Cooley building- is right on track to open this […]

    Video: Work Progresses At The Mill, Set To Open This Summer

    STARKVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) – It’s a multimillion dollar, state-of-the art renovation in Starkville.The transformation of the historic Mill- or Mississippi State’s Cooley building- is right on track to open this […]
  • Annual luncheon provides funds for Salvation Army expansion

    Video: Empty Bowls Luncheon Raises Funds for Salvation Army

    Annual luncheon provides funds for Salvation Army expansion
  • A 10 block stretch of College Street will be closed for re-paving

    Video: Busy Columbus Street Will be Closed for at Least a Week

    A 10 block stretch of College Street will be closed for re-paving
  • The first Airbus Helicopters AS350 AStar helicopter completely assembled in the U.S. has received airworthiness certification from the Federal Aviation Administration.

    Airbus Reaches Milestone With AS350

    The first Airbus Helicopters AS350 AStar helicopter completely assembled in the U.S. has received airworthiness certification from the Federal Aviation Administration.
  • Starkville leaders threw their support and funding behind a new industrial park.

    Video: Starkville Leaders Financially Back Industrial Park Project

    Starkville leaders threw their support and funding behind a new industrial park.
  • Alderman take strides on the Starkville Police and City Hall renovation project.

    Video: Starkville Aldermen Narrow Options for P.D/City Hall Renovation

    Alderman take strides on the Starkville Police and City Hall renovation project.
  • Tupelo has been overseeing redevelopment of a portion of the West Jackson Street corridor for several years and officials say it is making a positive impact.

    Video: Redevelopment Makes Positive Impact on Tupelo

    Tupelo has been overseeing redevelopment of a portion of the West Jackson Street corridor for several years and officials say it is making a positive impact.
  • City leaders look into redevelopment options for Columbus.

    Video: Columbus Explores Redevelopment Options

    City leaders look into redevelopment options for Columbus.
  • The city of Tupelo has moved forward with an energy saving contract.

    Video: Tupelo Leaders Move Forward with Energy Contract

    The city of Tupelo has moved forward with an energy saving contract.
  • Lawsuit Against Amory School District Can Go Forward

    Video: Lawsuit Against Amory School District Can Go Forward

    Lawsuit Against Amory School District Can Go Forward
  • A swing at new golf club in West Point

    Video: Mossy Oak Golf Club To Open

    A swing at new golf club in West Point
  • State Museum Officials Look to the Future in Tupelo

    Video: State Museum Officials Look to the Future in Tupelo

    State Museum Officials Look to the Future in Tupelo
  • Public Service Commissioner Brandon Presley moving town hall meeting to April in light of possible severe weather this week.

    Video: Potential for Severe Weather Forcing Postponement of Town Hall Meeting

    Public Service Commissioner Brandon Presley moving town hall meeting to April in light of possible severe weather this week.
  • STARKVILLE, Miss.--The State Fountain Bakery at Mississippi State soon will be relocated next door in the Colvard Student Union.

Moe's Southwest Grill is taking its place at the north end of Perry Hall, according to officials of the university's Division of Student Affairs and Aramark, the campus food provider. 

In a national survey conducted this year by Restaurant Business Magazine, the Atlanta, Georgia-based Mexican food chain is ranked No. 1 by consumers.

Bill Broyles, interim student affairs vice president, said MSU students have been rallying to bring Moe's to Mississippi State for the past three years. 

"We are excited to be able to deliver them the fresh new option to the MSU meal plan they have requested," he said, also emphasizing that the classic State Fountain bakery treats still will be readily available.

"Bakery chefs will continue baking in the same location they have operated since 1921 in the lower level of Perry Cafeteria," he added.

An MSU alumnus, Broyles said campus patrons, returning MSU graduates and visitors soon will find the State Fountain's renowned goods, including dog bone sugar cookies, as well as campus-made ice cream and other MSU dairy products in the union's first-floor Gaddis Hunt Commons food court. The State Fountain also will serve panini sandwiches on fresh-baked bread.

Plans call for the bakery to be in its new location just after Memorial Day, while Moe's is scheduled to open by the fall semester's August student move-in day.

According to the restaurant's website, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, currently has the Moe's location closest to Starkville. 

Jason Nall, MSU Dining Services executive director, echoed Broyles' remarks, saying university officials have been "working so hard to bring Moe's to Starkville." Also Aramark's senior resident manager, he described the chain as "a new Southwest concept that offers craveable, cost-friendly menu items that are customized to unique dietary needs."

Renovations to the current bakery location will include the addition of an all-weather patio in front that Moe's will share with the Subway restaurant location next door, Nall said.

During much of the 20th century, the bakery was a campus dining staple located where the MSU Florist now operates. It was moved to the north end of Perry during the 1976-85 presidential administration of James D. McComas.

    MSU Bakery Moving, Moe’s Taking Its Location

    STARKVILLE, Miss.--The State Fountain Bakery at Mississippi State soon will be relocated next door in the Colvard Student Union. Moe's Southwest Grill is taking its place at the north end of Perry Hall, according to officials of the university's Division of Student Affairs and Aramark, the campus food provider. In a national survey conducted this year by Restaurant Business Magazine, the Atlanta, Georgia-based Mexican food chain is ranked No. 1 by consumers. Bill Broyles, interim student affairs vice president, said MSU students have been rallying to bring Moe's to Mississippi State for the past three years. "We are excited to be able to deliver them the fresh new option to the MSU meal plan they have requested," he said, also emphasizing that the classic State Fountain bakery treats still will be readily available. "Bakery chefs will continue baking in the same location they have operated since 1921 in the lower level of Perry Cafeteria," he added. An MSU alumnus, Broyles said campus patrons, returning MSU graduates and visitors soon will find the State Fountain's renowned goods, including dog bone sugar cookies, as well as campus-made ice cream and other MSU dairy products in the union's first-floor Gaddis Hunt Commons food court. The State Fountain also will serve panini sandwiches on fresh-baked bread. Plans call for the bakery to be in its new location just after Memorial Day, while Moe's is scheduled to open by the fall semester's August student move-in day. According to the restaurant's website, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, currently has the Moe's location closest to Starkville. Jason Nall, MSU Dining Services executive director, echoed Broyles' remarks, saying university officials have been "working so hard to bring Moe's to Starkville." Also Aramark's senior resident manager, he described the chain as "a new Southwest concept that offers craveable, cost-friendly menu items that are customized to unique dietary needs." Renovations to the current bakery location will include the addition of an all-weather patio in front that Moe's will share with the Subway restaurant location next door, Nall said. During much of the 20th century, the bakery was a campus dining staple located where the MSU Florist now operates. It was moved to the north end of Perry during the 1976-85 presidential administration of James D. McComas.
  • Founded in 1997, H.M. Richards employs approximately 900 workers at its Guntown facility and faces $55,100 in proposed penalties.

    Guntown Firm Faces Fine Over Worker’s Death

    Founded in 1997, H.M. Richards employs approximately 900 workers at its Guntown facility and faces $55,100 in proposed penalties.
  • Four settlements in cases of alleged Do Not Call law violations will yield a combined $22,136.34 for the State.

    Firms Fined for ‘No-Call’ Violations

    Four settlements in cases of alleged Do Not Call law violations will yield a combined $22,136.34 for the State.
  • Lowndes supervisors are expected to approve final plans for the 4000 square foot addition at their March 13th meeting.

    Video: Lowndes County Supervisors Likely to Approve Funding for New 911 Center

    Lowndes supervisors are expected to approve final plans for the 4000 square foot addition at their March 13th meeting.
  • Lee County will pay the difference between what an officer receives from worker's compensation and disability benefits and his or her regular paycheck.

    Video: Lee County Supervisors Vote to Increase Compensation to Officers Injured on Duty

    Lee County will pay the difference between what an officer receives from worker's compensation and disability benefits and his or her regular paycheck.
  • The Boys and Girls Clubs of North Mississippi gets a financial boost from a civic group.

    Video: Tupelo Rotarians Make Generous donation to Boys and Girls Clubs

    The Boys and Girls Clubs of North Mississippi gets a financial boost from a civic group.
  • Burns Bottom Redevelopment

    Video: Columbus Redevelopment Authority to Present Burns Bottom Plans to City Council

    Burns Bottom Redevelopment
  • No more stickers

    Video: Eliminating Inspection Stickers

    No more stickers
  • The United Autoworkers have objected to the successful effort last month to kick the union out of a Hamilton, Alabama plant last month.

    Union Dispute Continues in Hamilton, AL.

    The United Autoworkers have objected to the successful effort last month to kick the union out of a Hamilton, Alabama plant last month.
  • By Emily Wagster Pettus

Associated Press

JACKSON – It’s election year, and Mississippi policymakers are engaged in an escalating debate over who can offer the biggest, juiciest tax cut.

The resolution is weeks away, with legislators facing a late March deadline to agree on tax and spending plans. It’s not clear what sort of tax cut will survive, if any. That could depend on a clash of wills and a fight over which legislators can claim most credit for the final product.

The Senate Democratic Leader, Hob Bryan of Amory, said with more than a bit of exasperation in his voice last week that the Republican-led effort to reduce revenue could undermine budgets for schools, transportation and other vital state services.

“There’s never been anything like what’s going on this year,” Bryan said. “I’m inclined to offer a constitutional amendment to prohibit the Legislature from convening during election years.”

Those pushing for tax cuts, including Republican Rep. Mark Formby of Picayune, said letting people keep more of what they earn will stimulate the economy.

“Government produces nothing except what it gains from the pocket of the taxpayer,” Formby said.

For generations, Mississippi has been one of the poorest states in the nation. The state-funded portion of the annual budget is just over $6 billion now, with billions more from the federal government.

Republican Gov. Phil Bryant said months ago that he wants to reduce the state income tax for people earning less than about $53,000 a year. His proposal would return $79 million a year to about 300,000 households, for an average tax cut of about $250 a year. The cut would take effect only in years when state revenue grows at least 3 percent.

Next up was Republican Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, who proposed phasing out both the business franchise tax and one portion of the state income tax. The estimated price tag on his plan is $382 million.

Not to be outdone, Republican House Speaker Philip Gunn proposed a $1.7 billion plan to phase out the state personal income tax over 15 years, with cuts coming only in years that state revenue grows at least 3 percent. The personal income tax is one of the largest sources of state revenue.

The Reeves plan is Senate Bill 2839 and it has passed the Senate. The Gunn plan is House Bill 1629 and it has passed the House. The two chambers are exchanging bills for more work.

For now, the Bryant plan is nowhere to be seen, but it could become an option for legislators to consider during final negotiations.

The House debate was particularly contentious. Democrats warned that Republicans were trying to create campaign fodder: Imagine postcards or radio commercials that labelpeople as tax-and-spend liberals. To combat that, Democrats offered 10 amendments that would force Republicans to go on record against certain types of tax cuts, including a reduction in grocery taxes.

One amendment said the income tax could be phased out only if the school budget formula, the Mississippi Adequate Education Program, were fully funded for three consecutive years. MAEP was put into law in 1997 as a way to give schools enough money to meet midlevel academic standards, but it has been fully funded only twice, and those were not consecutive years.

All of the Democrats’ amendments failed. But in losing those votes, some Democrats got part of what they wanted – just as some Republicans will get part of what they want even if all the proposals die. 
They got a chance to say they voted for tax cuts, and the other party voted against them.

    Tax Cut Deal Still Needs Work by Legislature

    By Emily Wagster Pettus Associated Press JACKSON – It’s election year, and Mississippi policymakers are engaged in an escalating debate over who can offer the biggest, juiciest tax cut. The resolution is weeks away, with legislators facing a late March deadline to agree on tax and spending plans. It’s not clear what sort of tax cut will survive, if any. That could depend on a clash of wills and a fight over which legislators can claim most credit for the final product. The Senate Democratic Leader, Hob Bryan of Amory, said with more than a bit of exasperation in his voice last week that the Republican-led effort to reduce revenue could undermine budgets for schools, transportation and other vital state services. “There’s never been anything like what’s going on this year,” Bryan said. “I’m inclined to offer a constitutional amendment to prohibit the Legislature from convening during election years.” Those pushing for tax cuts, including Republican Rep. Mark Formby of Picayune, said letting people keep more of what they earn will stimulate the economy. “Government produces nothing except what it gains from the pocket of the taxpayer,” Formby said. For generations, Mississippi has been one of the poorest states in the nation. The state-funded portion of the annual budget is just over $6 billion now, with billions more from the federal government. Republican Gov. Phil Bryant said months ago that he wants to reduce the state income tax for people earning less than about $53,000 a year. His proposal would return $79 million a year to about 300,000 households, for an average tax cut of about $250 a year. The cut would take effect only in years when state revenue grows at least 3 percent. Next up was Republican Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves, who proposed phasing out both the business franchise tax and one portion of the state income tax. The estimated price tag on his plan is $382 million. Not to be outdone, Republican House Speaker Philip Gunn proposed a $1.7 billion plan to phase out the state personal income tax over 15 years, with cuts coming only in years that state revenue grows at least 3 percent. The personal income tax is one of the largest sources of state revenue. The Reeves plan is Senate Bill 2839 and it has passed the Senate. The Gunn plan is House Bill 1629 and it has passed the House. The two chambers are exchanging bills for more work. For now, the Bryant plan is nowhere to be seen, but it could become an option for legislators to consider during final negotiations. The House debate was particularly contentious. Democrats warned that Republicans were trying to create campaign fodder: Imagine postcards or radio commercials that labelpeople as tax-and-spend liberals. To combat that, Democrats offered 10 amendments that would force Republicans to go on record against certain types of tax cuts, including a reduction in grocery taxes. One amendment said the income tax could be phased out only if the school budget formula, the Mississippi Adequate Education Program, were fully funded for three consecutive years. MAEP was put into law in 1997 as a way to give schools enough money to meet midlevel academic standards, but it has been fully funded only twice, and those were not consecutive years. All of the Democrats’ amendments failed. But in losing those votes, some Democrats got part of what they wanted – just as some Republicans will get part of what they want even if all the proposals die. They got a chance to say they voted for tax cuts, and the other party voted against them.
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