Heather Black

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Some Northeast Mississippi Teachers Jump Into A Moving Classroom

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TUPELO, Miss. (WCBI)-Teachers are finding new ways to make learning more fun.

It wasn’t a typical teacher’s workshop with hours of lecturing. Instead, it had hours of moving. Some Northeast Mississippi teachers spent the day learning how to make their subjects fun and interactive.

Hopping on one foot while going around in a circle. This teacher workshop could be mistaken for an exercise class.

Educators put themselves in their student’s shoes at the Kinesthetic workshop in Tupelo.

Mississippi really has taken hold of the movement culture obesity rates in kids are down and we’re going further than that talking about how using movement in the classroom can raise academic achievement as well,” says Mike Kuczeala.

Kinesthetic teaching helps children learn any subject in school by seeing, hearing, and doing. One teacher says she can’t wait to use these tools in her classroom.

“I’m a science teacher so I teach cell division and the kids are like blah blah blah what is mitosis and cell division? But when we are in a circle and we use the balloons and relying on each other and they are already in their circle to form that cell division we can start to work after that and they’ll be energized for that,” says Kimberly Jackson.

Kimberly Jackson, a seventh grade teacher, says these new learning techniques could help raise test scores.

“We are concentrating on getting these test scores up and the review games keeps them making kin esthetically just learning to see the connection,” says Jackson.

Author and educator Mike Kuczeala put many of the theories in practice by combining information with movement. Mike says our brains and bodies work hand in hand.

“The brain prefers to learn implicitly it’s movement based, it’s emotional based and often schools we leave it to the explicit channels and this is the way to increase implicit,” says Kuczeala

Amy Martin, a Physical Educator at Cook Elementary is no stranger to these methods. She’s used some of them for years.

“Lots of teachers think I’ll lose control if I get them up out of their seat, but if they’ll starts teaching the boundaries and they use this in the classroom. It’s going to be benefit the kids tremendously,” says Amy Martin.

So students, the next time you’re having a hard time studying for a test, try moving around a little bit.

Brain breaks are another important exercise for students in the classroom.