RH Brown

About RH Brown

The former veteran radio announcer and veteran Vietnam Era Army Medic is also an author. His autobiographical book, Call Me Gullah: An American Heritage is available via amazon.com in paperback and kindle.

Video: The Impact of the Creation of 100 Jobs

LOUISVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) – A Mississippi State University study was done a few years ago through its Cooperative Extension Service to spotlight the effect 100 jobs would have on a small community of people.

It’s Tuesday afternoon and in Louisville, city and county officials are celebrating their existing industrial base.

Existing jobs represent 85% when it comes to employment dollars.

“Every community is part of their strategy is got to be about supporting their local industry base and helping them to expand and even retain jobs,” said Gerald Mills, Louisville Economic Development Executive.

Be that as it may, 100 jobs would certainly be welcomed with open arms in a city like Louisville that has about 66 hundred residents.

Of course, it’s not Severstal with 620 jobs or American Eurocoter with its 300 workers in Lowndes County, but even one extra job adds dollars.

“If we were to bring in a new industry of 100 jobs in a community of our size, you can look at statistics but a hundred would significantly effect our unemployment numbers. Not only that the ripple effect would be incredible for our community. Bringing in some outside dollars,” said Will Hill, Louisville Mayor.

“It would help our current retailers, our service providers. It would be a possible impact to our schools. We know that it would just enhance the life of so many families,” added Hill.

City and county government would give a new industry tax breaks, the payroll money from those 100 jobs would be readily recouped by local folks with extra money to spend.

“We are certainly delighted to have our industry in our community and we are always focused on retaining the industry we have. Would love to recruit new industry but most importantly job creation is key and it’s the topic of all conversation right now,” said Hill.

Tuesday (Oct. 29) Louisville city and county officials, business professionals, and other residents celebrated their existing industrial base during a luncheon at the Louisville County Club.