RH Brown

About RH Brown

The former veteran radio announcer and veteran Vietnam Era Army Medic is also an author. His autobiographical book, Call Me Gullah: An American Heritage is available via amazon.com in paperback and kindle.

Video: Chickasaw County Civil War Museum

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HOUSTON, Miss. (WCBI) — The Civil War Museum is the latest addition to a wing of the Chickasaw County Heritage Museum in Houston. Curators are counting on increased foot traffic coming through their doors.

A grassroots effort from volunteers has made possible the completion of Phase Two of a project, keeping alive the history of how life was for veterans of the civil war and people living in Houston and Chickasaw County.

“We have had people who volunteered to do certain things. Provide a service for us. We had some collections of monetary donations. Of course that’s always very important,” said Larry Davis/Chickasaw County Heritage Museum.

“But if someone wants to lend us some memorabilia, we keep good records and if they want us to show it for 6 months then we make that information available for six months and keep up with it that way and then return it,” said Janice Dyson/Museum Curator.

A Civil War drum used by soldiers marching into battle, a 150 year old pistol found in a Macedonia cemetery while a grave was being dug. All bits of history reminding us of a bygone era are being showcased. On display, Union spy Levi Naron of the Atlanta Community who served several union generals.

“For the Union, yes. He was close to death on a couple of different occasions. Close to being hung on one or two occasions. But managed to talk his way out of it both times,” said Davis.

Keeping alive accurate records of a war that has forever impacted the lives of families is ready for public viewing.

“This is the last full year of the sesquicentennial celebration of the American civil War. So we put together the civil war history as it relates to Chickasaw County. And its been well received,” said Davis.

“We tend to sort of push things in the background, but when we have this memorabilia and people ask questions, oh, what is this. What is that used for. Then we have an opportunity to tell them about it. And top keep that memory going for generation after generation,” said Dyson.

Phase Three of the work is the next project as curators expand the Chickasaw Museum by 800 square feet.