Allie Martin

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Video: Children Prepare For A New Phase In Life Through Pilot Program

TUPELO, MISS. (WCBI) – Any parent knows that putting a child into kindergarten can sometimes be an anxious time for youngsters and adults.
But a pilot program at one elementary school is helping kids and parents make the transition. WCBI’s Allie Martin has more.

For two and a half hours each day this week,

these four and five year olds are getting a taste of what kindergarten will be like.

It’s part of “Splash Into Kindergarten” and it’s taking place at Parkway Elementary. The idea came from a parent who has a child entering Parkway in August.

“You can call it a readiness program, what it will do is get them ready to understand the rules versus going to school or going to daycare. Some of the daycare rules are different from school rules,” said Stephanie Stanfield, the parent who started “Splash into Kindergarten.”

Forty students are taking part in the program, which covers everything from learning how to share supplies, choosing correct letters as part of a high tech board game,  and how to be quiet in the hallways.

“The bubbles and buckles is a way we teach them to have their mouths quiet where no noise is coming out and the buckles is a way to restrain their hands or keep their hands to themselves so they’re not touching the walls or touching other students in line,” said Kindergarten Teacher Morgan Abraham.

The future students also have a chance to get familiar with Parkway and they can help set the example for classmates who weren’t able to “Splash into Kindergarten.”

“When we start the first week of school is always busy, teaching routines, so the hope is that we have some children who have already been introduced to that so they can be role models and help the transition at the beginning of school,” said Principal Mitzi Moore.

Administrators, teachers and volunteers hope the program could be in place at all schools in the district next year.

“Splash Into Kindergarten” is also made possible with help from “Parents for Public Schools” and Lee County’s “Excel by 5.”