RH Brown

About RH Brown

The former veteran radio announcer and veteran Vietnam Era Army Medic is also an author. His autobiographical book, Call Me Gullah: An American Heritage is available via amazon.com in paperback and kindle.

Video: Louisville Youth Council Smokin’ Hot

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LOUISVILLE, Miss. (WCBI) — Smoking is now banned in public places in the town of Louisville. And, it looks like a group of Louisville teenagers may have had something to do about the change.

Louisville High School Student Jordan Maury is a member of the Mayor’s Youth Council. When the teenager joined forces with his other peers at Winston Academy, it helped in taking the city to another level.

“We wanted to make our city a better place for everyone. We wanted to make sure we got rid of all the smoke. Make sure everyone enjoyed a facility without having to worry about things such as cigarettes, second hand smoke,” said Jordan Maury, Louisville High School Student.

“Our council actually brought it to our board. We brought it to their attention. We have a few of our council members actually bring it up in one of their meetings. And that’s when we really got really passionate about it. And decided that our town really needed more education on being tobacco free,” said Macey Donald, Mayor’s Youth Council.

Its not that elder politician were not doing their jobs, the city had already in place an ordinance regarding some city establishments.

“That’s what we have adopted to have a smoke free town. We already had smoke free restaurants, but we wanted the whole town to be smoke free,” said Frances Ball, Louisville City Alderwoman.

“I just thought it was very unbelievable because you know its great to know that all of the aldermen would say yes,” said Madelon Taylor, Winston Academy Student.

It was indeed a unanimous vote on the part of those city officials. There seems to be the same type of harmony existing between the Youth Council, and Louisville business owners in the city.

“In our town I think it was a healthy conscience that got most of our restaurants, most of our businesses, they were smoke free. What we did we just put it on paper and made it official,” said Macey Donald.

“As a restaurant downtown we’ve actually always been smoke free. I don’t believe its controversial at all. We’ve never had an issue with smokers, we’ve never even had anybody ask did we have a smoking section. We’ve always been smoke free since I guess day one. Five years now,” said Johnny Wooten, Market Cafe.

“They’re just a group of interesting young people that’s interested in the town and i think that’s good for them and for us,” said Ball.

The city wide ban could go into effect as early as April.