RH Brown

About RH Brown

The former veteran radio announcer and veteran Vietnam Era Army Medic is also an author. His autobiographical book, Call Me Gullah: An American Heritage is available via amazon.com in paperback and kindle.

Video: Spring Pollen Season

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UNDATED, Miss.  (WCBI)- Spring is typically the worst time of the year for seasonal allergies.  Trees and flowers are in bloom. Clouds of pollen are lazily making their way onto everything.  You know its spring when you can see that yellow haze on trees, grass and weeds.  On a scale of zero to twelve, this Tuesday’s pollen count adds up to a whopping eleven point two.

“I don’t know. Its heavy this year. There is lots of pollen out there. You can see clouds of pollen moving through, moving around in the air. Which is always kind of neat,” said Andrew Londo, MSU Professor.

“I have lots of pine trees in my yard. I mean everything in my yard is yellow, Ha, ha, ha,” added Londo.

Pine pollen grains are small and smooth, non-allergenic.  Oak pollen grains are bigger and can cause the sneezing and sniffling.

“Everything is blooming not just the pine trees. So you know there is lots of pollen from lots of different species out there. We get a few good rains, you know, help clear the air. Pollen season you know the pollen should be dispersed,” said Londo.

And what about climate change? Could global warming make the yellow nightmare that much worse?

“You know there may be a relationship there and at some point in the future we’ll be able to tell, but right now I’ve not heard of any such relationship,” said Londo.

Rain is expected in the next two days, that could bring the pollen count down from 11.2 to 7.9.