Heather Black

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Video: Cell Phone Usage May Be Allowed In Amory Classrooms

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AMORY, Miss. (WCBI) — Just five years ago schools were finding ways to put a stop to cell phone usage in the classroom.

Now, educators are finding cell phones and other technology can help students learn.

When Masha Laney begins class everyday, she expects cell phones to be silent devices.

However, change may be coming to her classroom.

Amory School District leaders are now looking to incorporate cell phones and iPads into their curriculum.

“As of now we have a policy that we don’t use cell phone at all but we realize that with the importance of technology and immediate access to information that we’re going to have make sure adjustments to our policy to put our children on the same playing field with everybody else,” says Tony Cook.

With smart phones, a world of information is available at the fingertips of students. But monitoring usage could be a challenge.

“I do see where they could be a valuable source of information but they also can be a distraction. We just really need a tight infrastructure within the school system of when to use cell phones how to use cell phones or technology in general,” says Masha Laney.

Superintendent Tony Cook says Amory schools have an idea how to prevent students from accessing social media and other sites while in the classroom.

“We have a wireless access in all of our schools and as long as teachers and principals monitor that students are on our wireless we can filter an filter will help keep them from going to those places,” says Cook.

Mrs. Laney is still unsure about implementing the devices into a daily routine but admits there are several apps that can help students prepare for state wide testing.

“There is a Quizlet App that you can download on an iPhone and it is a resource that kids can use to study for the state history test so it would have been nice at that point in time to allow them to use their cell phones but because I am a rule follower I don’t break policy,” says Laney.

For the last decade, technology has been behind the evolution of education and that’s not changing any time soon.

New Albany and Tupelo school districts ban devices as well but allow exceptions when teachers feel they can help with research in the classroom.