Caresse Jackman

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Video: Oktibbeha School Transfers In Debate

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OKTIBBEHA COUNTY, Miss. (WCBI)-Transferring School Districts. It’s an issue several parents have when they’re trying to give their child a better education.

In Oktibbeha County, it’s a growing issue, especially considering that county schools lost their accreditation.

But, the Starkville School Board of Trustees is tabling that issue, trying to decide whether or not they want to allow future transfers.

Orlando Trainer is District 2 supervisor for Oktibbeha County. It’s his job to make sure the county is run effectively and smoothly. He’s also a parent. Trainer’s 3 children attend county schools. Now, he wants them transferred.

“I think that when it boils down to it, parents try to do what’s in the best interest of their children,” says Supervisor Trainer.

Like any other parent, he wants wants his kids to stay ahead.

“When you look at all the other things that children should be exposed to, to give them the type of advantage that they need to be able to compete with some of the things that may be coming up on them..then quite naturally you compare the Oktibbeha County school district to the Starkville Public School district and there’s a lot of difference between the two,” says Trainer.

In order to transfer your child, both the departing school and the receiving one, have to sign off on the transfer. Conservator Jayne Sargent says she won’t hold anyone back if they choose to transfer from Oktibbeha County Schools, but says the Department of Education is doing everything possible to bring school accreditation back.

“Our #1 goal is to regain accreditation. And we’re coming up with ways that it will be done. First with the report that was done by the State department..to be sure that those things are checked off and make sure that those things won’t happen again,” says Sargent.

Eddie Myles with the Board of Trustees says they understand the concerns many parents may have about accreditation issues. But, given the financial constraints, it’s something they have to look into carefully.

“When you have an influx of students coming in. Where are you going put them?? How are you going house these kids?? And ofcourse, the teaching possibility–when you’re going from 20 to 24 kids a classroom to possibly 30 plus kids in a classroom. Those are some of the issues we’re facing. And financially,how do you financially take care of all the kids,” says Myles.

The school board is scheduled to take up the decision again at their next meeting on December 4th.